We are proud to announce the addition of Six Nations House to Niagara on the Lake Vacation Rentals.

The Six Nations House has four bedrooms and four and a half bathrooms, located in the heart of historic Niagara-on-the Lake.

The history and some significant information on the décor within this spectacular property:

Originally the site of a Neutral Nation village known as Onghiara. Following its resettlement by British Loyalists the village became the first capital of Upper Canada in 1792. The British, along with Six Nations forces and other Native allies, fought Americans for control of this strategic town and region during the War of 1812.

Famous Native leaders such as Joseph Brant, John Norton, and John Brant walked these hallowed grounds while they forged and maintained diplomatic relations with Sir William Johnson, John Butler, Sir Isaac Brock, and other historic figures who collectively shaped and defined the borders and character of a new nation.

Six Nations House is a custom home designed to exhibit the Georgian architecture, charm, and character of yesteryear. Two hundred years after the War of 1812, Six Nations House opened to recognize and honor Six Nations and other First Nation contributions to the development of Canada, renew an old alliance, and make history once again.

Two Row Wampum Belt

Also known as Guswenta, this wampum belt represents a mutual treaty agreement, made in 1613 between representatives of the Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) and representatives of the Dutch government in what is now upstate New York. The agreement is considered by the Haudenosaunee to be the basis of all of their subsequent treaties with European and North American governments, and the citizens of those nations, including the Covenant Chain treaty with the British in 1677 and the Treaty of Canandaigua with the United States in 1794.

William Claus (Pledge of the Crown) Wampum Belt

In April 1815 Native nations who were allies of the British during the War of 1812 were invited to gather at Burlington Heights (present day Hamilton, Ontario) by William Claus, then Superintendent of Indian Affairs, who presented this belt to the Six Nations and Native allies. Over a three-day gathering Claus shared messages of peace and condolence. Following the customs of these Nations he presented them with this wampum belt called the “Pledge of the Crown”. This gathering allowed Claus to reaffirm the Treaty of Ghent, which had formally ended the War of 1812 on December 24th, 1814. The war saw many Native Nations torn between the treaty agreements they had made with the British and Americans and their personal and familial relationships and responsibilities.

John Brant Wampum Belt

The two squares at either end of the belt are symbols of the council fires of the British Crown and the Iroquois Confederacy (Haudenosaunee). It is believed that when John Brant was elected to the Provincial Legislature for Haldimand in 1823, the Confederacy Council was concerned he might want to reform the government. This belt reflects the separation of these two forms of government and was given to John Brant to continue to remind him of his responsibility to the Confederacy.

Water Drum

Water drums are a category of “membranophone” drums and are characterized by the filling of the drum chamber with some amount of water to create a unique resonant sound. Water drums are used in IroquoisNavajoCherokeeCreek, and Apache music, and are widespread in North and South America. They are used today both ceremonially and in traditional Longhouse social dances.

Horn Rattle

The horn rattle is used in ceremonial and social songs as a companion to the water drum. It is made with Buffalo or cow horns and filled with stone pebbles or metal BBs. The handles are made from various types of wood, maple, cedar, cherry wood, etc.

Condolence Cane

The Condolence cane is a pictographic record of the fifty hereditary chief titles which where were given at the time of the forming of the League of Five Nations (later to become the Six Nations). These titles live forever and each time a new chief is installed he takes on the title of the chief that has died. Condolence canes always have an Eagle on top. This signifies the watchful vigilance required to sustain the peace and protect the people.

Thundering Waters – Niagara Falls

by Robert Griffing (giclée canvas print)
This masterwork depicts Haudenosaunee (Iroquois or Six Nations) people at the precipice of Niagara Falls. The word Niagara comes from an Iroquoian language description in the region, meaning “the neck” or “the straight.” The Frenchman Samuel de Champlain visited the area as early as 1604 during his exploration of Canada, and members of his party reported to him the spectacular waterfalls, which he described in his journals.

After a thirty-year advertising career Robert Griffing returned to the subject of his early fascination, the Eastern Woodland Indian of the 18th century. He describes himself as a painter of the Woodland Indians and focuses on a time that marked the beginning years of chaos and uncertainty for the Woodland tribes as they struggled to survive the encroachment of Europeans.

Sculpture of Laura Secord

In 1901, Canadian sculptor Mildred Peel crafted the lovely and much-celebrated bust of Laura Secord that adorns the memorial at the Secord gravesite in Drummond Hill Cemetery. Admired by many as the most evocative and beautiful artistic portrayal of the famed Canadian heroine ever produced, the bronze bust was made from a plaster casting master which now resides in the Niagara Historical Society and Museum in Niagara on the Lake. The Friends of Laura Secord commissioned the project to reproduce the sculpture, using 3D-scanning and digital printing technology, to produce scale replicas that are accurate down to the finest detail.

Gathering of the Clans

by Arnold Jacobs

This offset lithograph by Arnold Jacobs, an Onondaga Chief and internationally recognized artist, depicts the nine clan animals of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois or Six Nations). Three are water animals, the eel, beaver, and turtle. Three are land animals, the deer, bear, and wolf. And three are sky animals, the hawk, heron, and snipe. The image also depicts the Great Tree of Peace and the Eagle, which flies high and has sharp eyesight, and whose symbolic duty is to remain vigilant to protect the peace and the people.

The Great Peace: Six Nations House Family

by Raymond Skye

This original pencil, pen and ink drawing depicts the family that owns Six Nations House. The father is wolf clan Mohawk, indicated by the three feathers, and their positions, on his headdress (Gustoweh), while the mother and children are bear clan Oneida. Because Haudenosaunee society is matrilineal the children follow the mother’s line. The owner is the seventh great grandson of Joseph Brant, who presided at the funeral of John Butler in Niagara-on-the-Lake, and the 6th great grand nephew of John Brant, who helped lead Six Nations warriors in the Battle of Queenston Heights.

Raymond Skye is a celebrated Six Nations fine artist who was commissioned to produce the sculptures and medallions for Landscape of Nations: The Six Nations & Native Allies Commemorative Memorial located in Queenston Heights Park.

John Brant (Ahyouwa’ehs)

by Raymond Skye

The son of Joseph Brant and Catharine Croghan Brant, John Brant was born into a strong leadership family of the Mohawk Nation. Born in Brantford, raised in Burlington Bay, and educated in Ancaster and Niagara-on-the-Lake, John Brant was a product of the region who lived in two worlds. Along with John Norton, he led Native forces at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He was made a lieutenant in the Indian Department and was involved in other engagements throughout the War of 1812. A strong advocate for building schools for his people, in 1828 he was appointed resident superintendent for the Six Nations of the Grand River. In 1830 he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Haldimand. Around that time his mother also appointed him as a traditional chief, Tekarihoga.

Raymond Skye is a celebrated Six Nations fine artist who was commissioned to produce the sculptures and medallions for Landscape of Nations: The Six Nations & Native Allies Commemorative Memorial located in Queenston Heights Park.

18th Century Map

This map, that shows the Niagara region and the western frontier of the United States at the end of the 18th Century, captures the period during which a great deal of history played out in Niagara-on-the-Lake. Around this time, many of the Haudenosaunee had been driven from New York State in campaigns of extinction ordered by George Washington and executed by General’s Clinton and Sullivan during the Revolutionary War in 1779.

New Mexico #1

by Fritz Scholder

This limited edition Pendleton wool blanket was produced by the National Museum of the American Indian as an exclusive product offering associated with the exhibit entitled Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian. It is based on a painting by Fritz Scholder (October 6, 1937 – February 10, 2005). Born in BreckenridgeMinnesota, Scholder was one-quarter Luiseño, a California Mission tribe. Scholder’s most influential works were post-modern in sensibility and somewhat Pop Art in execution as he sought to deconstruct the mythos of the American Indian. A teacher at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe in the late 1960s, Scholder influenced a generation of Native American students.

The Great Canandaigua Treaty – 1794

by Robert Griffing (giclée canvas print)

The Canandaigua Treaty is between the Haudenosaunee (Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy) and the United States of America – one of the first treaties the United States entered into. This treaty, drafted in Canandaigua, New York, which created a lasting peace and friendship between the Six Nations and the United States, was signed November 11, 1794, and ratified January 21, 1795, bearing the United States seal and George Washington’s signature. Peace and friendship forever were the basis upon which the Haudenosaunee leadership signed the Canandaigua Treaty. The treaty recognizes the sovereignty of the Haudenosaunee and the United States and establishes in writing that the aboriginal lands belonging to the Haudenosaunee are theirs. The Canandaigua Treaty remains, in the face of challenges, a valid legal document. (Farther down the hallway is a framed key that identifies the historic figures featured in this epic painting.)

After a thirty-year advertising career Robert Griffing returned to the subject of his early fascination, the Eastern Woodland Indian of the 18th century. He describes himself as a painter of the Woodland Indians and focuses on a time that marked the beginning years of chaos and uncertainty for the Woodland tribes as they struggled to survive the encroachment of Europeans.

The Great Peace: The Gathering of Good Minds

by Raymond Skye

This print of a pen and pencil artwork honors the people who established the great league of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois or Six Nations). They are the Peacemaker, his ally Hayenwa:tha, and Jikonsaseh who was the first woman to accept the message of peace. It honours the five original nations – Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca for their efforts in helping to form this confederacy of Indigenous nations.

John Norton (Teyoninhokarawen)

by Raymond Skye

John Norton, a protégé of Mohawk leader Joseph Brant, became a military leader of Six Nations forces that had allied with Great Britain in the War of 1812. He led a Six Nations contingent into battle during American invasions at Queenston Heights, Stony Creek, and Chippewa, and in numerous encounters throughout the Niagara Peninsula and other areas of conflict including at Tippecanoe and Detroit. At Queenston Heights, with less than 200 warriors, Native allies helped repulse the Americans, thereby securing an early victory in the war. A fascinating historical figure Norton had a Cherokee mother and Scottish father from Tennessee. Educated in Scotland, he joins British military and travels to North America, becomes immersed in Haudenosaunee culture and is adopted into the Mohawk nation.

 Raymond Skye is a celebrated Six Nations fine artist who was commissioned to produce the sculptures and medallions for Landscape of Nations: The Six Nations & Native Allies Commemorative Memorial located in Queenston Heights Park.

 Moon Dance

by Natasha Smoke Santiago

Natasha Smoke Santiago works in many mediums, often depicting Haudenosaunee women. This print shows women dancing at night, perhaps during a full moon festival or feast. Usually these ceremonies take place under the light of a full moon and represent women giving thanks to the grandmother moon and mother earth. In Haudenosaunee culture the women are leaders of the clans.

Natasha Smoke Santiago is a turtle clan woman of the Haudenosaunee or People of the Longhouse, otherwise known as The Iroquois. She resides within the Mohawk territory of Akwesasne.

War Chief

by Bruce King

This oil on canvas painting represents the Western Indian nations, including the Shawnee, Ojibwe, Winnebago, Menominee, and Potowatomi, and others, that allied with Britain during the War of 1812. The artist loves to use bright colors and textures, as is evident in his work.

Bruce King is an Oneida painter, playwright, musician, and actor. He is based in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Thank you for your interest in The Six Nations House, for rental information, please click the link below:

https://notlvacationrentals.com/vacation-rentals/six-nations-house/